(3) My Wine ID showcased

There are more than 1,300 grape varieties and thousands of different wines to choose from. How to make sense of so much variety?

A well kept secret among sommeliers and masters of wine is our beacon here: that all wines have a set of fundamental attributes in common that helps navigate between them. The Pulp Team has standardised these attributes in our Wine IDs (see our previous post for full details). Once I've figured out exactly what My Wine ID is, finding wines that perfectly match my taste will be so easy!

In this post we've showcased this simple approach by taking as a starting point four of the most widely drunk wines, and assuming that each of them in turn is a good representation of what My Wine ID is. Let's have a look together. 


 
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Setting out to find our perfect wine

Let’s start with a question: which wines do we like? Chances are we don’t really know how to answer this question. Finding a wine we love is something personal. It means finding a combination that perfectly fits our own palate. This is defined by how a wine's taste, aroma and looks. The combination of these three elements is what we call a Wine ID at Pulp.

Having explored our personal taste through tasting and comparing different wines, and having built My Wine ID, I'll have all the identikit picture of the perfect wine for me and I can go hunt for wines at better value.
 
If that sounds easier said than done, let us show how My Wine ID will help in practice.

 

 
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When thinking of red wines, “Cabernet Sauvignon” and “Shiraz” are probably the first that come to mind. These are the most common reds worldwide and, unfortunately, the wine industry finds it easier (read: more profitable) to promote these popular grapes. But there are more than 1,300 grape varieties around the world. That means that we are missing out on exploring many exciting and delicious wines made from different grapes by smaller, more interesting producers.
 
Still, we’ve all tried Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz and can say which one we like better. Let's assume that each of them in turn is a good representation of what My Wine ID is (in reality it is more sophisticated than this but for sake of showcasing it, please bear with us). Now, here’s a hot tip on how to start using My Wine ID to diversify my wine options:

 
 
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If you like Cabernet Sauvignon, you’ll also like...
 
Aglianico (from Southern Italy)
Carmenere (most often from Chile)
Sangiovese (the Tuscan grape Chianti is made from)

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If you like Shiraz, you’ll also like...
 
Pinotage (from South Africa)
Cannonau (from Sardinia, Italy)
Monastrell (from Spain)

 

 
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In the white wines department, you’re probably thinking of “Sauvignon Blanc” or “Pinot Grigio”. These are the most widely drunk whites worldwide.

Let's assume that each of them in turn is a good representation of what My Wine ID is (in reality it is more sophisticated than this but for sake of showcasing it, please bear with us). Now, here’s a hot tip on how to start using My Wine ID to diversify my wine options:

 
 
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If you like Sauvignon Blanc, you’ll also like…

Verdejo (from Spain)
Falanghina (from Southern Italy)
Torrontes (from Argentina)

If you like Pinot Grigio, you’ll also like...

Greco di Tufo (from Southern Italy)
Assyrtiko (from Greece)
Muscadet, better if labelled “sur lie” (from France)

 

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